Difference between Belgian Waffles and Regular Waffles

Published on November 23, 2016

What better way to start your day than with waffles for breakfast? But what kind of waffles do you choose when faced with the option of regular waffles and Belgian waffles? If you do not know the difference between them, keep reading and make sure you always choose your favorite type of waffle.

Definitions

Belgian waffle

Belgian waffles were first introduced in Belgium at the Brussels World Fair Expo in 1958 and in 1962 they were presented at the Century 21 Exposition in Seattle. Their popularity skyrocketed in New York thanks to Maurice Vermersch’s (a Belgium native) family business selling waffles plain or with whipped cream and chopped strawberries under the name of Bel-Gem Waffles.

They are made from leavened batter cooked between two hot irons with a pattern of deep square pockets. The dough contains yeast and preparation may require beating egg whites for a fluffier interior. The exterior is very crisp. Traditionally, the Belgian waffle is a type of food eaten on the street, without the need for forks and knives. As toppings are added, however, this becomes impossible. Belgian waffles can also be served at other meals as well, not only at breakfast.

Regular waffles

Regular waffles are a type of food known in Europe since as early as the Middle Ages. The term “waffle” is directly derived from the Dutch word wafele with alternative spellings throughout Europe: waffe, wafer, gofre, gaufre, waffle, vaffa. Regular waffles, the type you can quickly make at home, have baking powder to ensure the dough rises. They are a bit dense and therefore best served with juice and a fruit salad or plenty of sauce and toppings.

Belgian Waffles vs Regular Waffles

So what is the difference between Belgian waffles and regular waffles?

Belgian waffles are bigger in diameter than regular waffles. The irons they are made in have bigger and deeper pockets compared to the irons for regular waffles. As far as the recipe goes, Belgian waffles have yeast and egg whites in the dough and are left overnight to rise. They are tastier than regular waffles when served without toppings. 

Regular waffles are made with baking powder and come out dense. Their taste lies more in the toppings than in the waffle itself. They are smaller in diameter and are made in smaller irons.

Comparison Chart

Belgian waffle Regular waffle
Introduced in 1958 in Belgium and in 1962 in the U.S. Have been around in some form or another since the Middle Ages
Also known as Brussels waffles Also known as waffe, wafer, gofre, gaufre, waffle, vaffa
Made with a larger iron with very deep pockets Made with a smaller iron with shallower pockets
Dough is made with yeast and egg whites Dough is made with baking powder
Crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside A bit dense in texture
Can be served throughout the day A breakfast food